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Seasonal Hair Loss: Understanding Your Hair Year-Round

Seasonal hair loss is an increase in hair loss at specific times of the year.

During this period, the strands of hair shed more than in their normal state, and this is a process that usually takes place in the spring and fall. These seasons are also called hair shedding seasons. However, one can also she hair during winter. 

Here’s a recap of this article:

  • SEASONAL HAIR LOSS OCCURS AT CERTAIN TIMES OF THE YEAR, MOSTLY IN HAIR SHEDDING SEASONS.
  • HAIR LOSS MAY BE SEASONAL, BUT OTHER FACTORS ALSO NEED TO BE CONSIDERED.
  • ITCHING IS NOT ASSOCIATED WITH SEASONAL HAIR LOSS.
  • CHANGES IN TEMPERATURE STRESS THE SCALP AND FOLLICLES.
  • SEASONAL HAIR LOSS IS TEMPORARY, AND IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO REDUCE IT COMPLETELY. 
  • AFTER SEASONAL HAIR LOSS, HAIR GROWS BACK.

 

Let’s get into the details.

What Is Seasonal Hair Loss?

Seasonal hair loss is a natural phenomenon that occurs at specific times of the year. Hair strands shed slightly more than usual. 

Hair loss of 50-100 strands per day is considered typical, with some people losing up to 200 strands each day. This cycle happens throughout the growing (anagen phase) and resting (telogen phase) phases of hair follicles.

While the hair is in the resting phase, it stays in the follicles and does not grow actively. These hair strands are shed for new hair to grow. Then the hair returns to the anagen phase and hair actively grows from the follicles. All of these happen according to the circadian rhythm. 

In order to fully understand seasonal hair loss, we need to know and understand the hair growth phases. 

hair loss cycle, seasonal hair loss, anagen phase, hair loss phase

Is Hair Loss Seasonal?

Yes, there is a fact called seasonal hair loss and it is also proven by Swedish researchers.

They studied the lives of 823 women for six years. They noted that most hair loss occurred in hair shedding seasons which are September, October, and November. It is followed by March, April, and May which are the spring hair loss periods. 

However, the only reason for hair loss is not ‘’seasonal hair shedding’’. We must keep in mind that genetic, hormonal, and medical conditions can also cause hair loss during those seasons.

What Season Does Hair Shed the Most?

Hair is mostly shed on fall but some factors can change the season. Among them there are geography, the amount of sun exposure, scalp protection and more.

Let’s check all the seasons to find out the best fit for your situation.

Spring Hair Shedding

Spring hair shedding is the most common hair loss. With the increase in sunlight, there is also an increase in the hormones that regulate the hair cycle in spring hair.

The reason for the increase in hair shedding in spring is usually based on this. That is why spring shedding starts in person.

Spring hair shedding can be scary for people because twice as much hair is lost compared to other periods. However, spring hair shed is hair loss that lasts for a short period of time.

Summer Hair Shedding

The scalp experiences stress when the hair is exposed to excessive sunlight with UV radiation. As a result of this, the melatonin hormone, which requires darker environments, is secreted less due to UV radiation and it also can cause hair loss.

We can associate summer seasonal hair loss with our hair entering the telogen phase during the summer because of the relationship between UV radiation and hair.

Hair and sun exposure are affected by each other. 

Fall Hair Shedding

UV Radiation of hair to sunlight causes hair loss. However, this shedding increases more in the fall months. It is also quite normal but it mostly starts at the end of summer which is the start of fall.

The fact that our hair is exposed to all the UV radiation in the summer, an extreme increase in hair loss is observed as the season passes because of the lack of melatonin.

Winter Hair Shedding

Hair falling out in winter happens as a continuation of fall hair shedding. Fall shedding lasts longer than other hair loss which happens in spring and summer. Hair cortisol levels are also crucial. So, winter hair loss is also the cause of depression in winter because of the stress hormone level. 

However, does your hair shed more in the winter? It can be, because the hair follicles are dried out because of the cold weather, and hair thinning in winter also occurs. Winter hair shedding is also common but as we mentioned above, not as much as spring hair shedding and fall hair shedding.

Is Your Hair Loss Seasonal or Something Else?

Your hair loss could be seasonal shedding or caused by another factor. It is critical to visit a dermatologist or other professional for this and receive a dermatological consultation.

Let’s look at the questions your doctor might ask to determine the source of your hair loss.

❓ Do you have hair loss during particular months? Are you losing a little more hair than usual during these months?

❓ Did your hair loss worsen as a result of a diet or a product you used?

❓ Have you ever had a hair loss problem when you were stressed?

❓ Is there a hair loss history in your family?

❓ Could you be suffering from trichotillomania, which is a mental disorder?

According to your answers, the reason for hair loss will be understood whether it is seasonal alopecia or not.

Does Seasonal Shedding Cause Itching?

No, it does not cause itching. Itching due to seasonal hair loss can be seen rarely, but the direct cause is not hair loss.

The reasons that cause itching can usually be listed as follows: 

⚠️SOME HAIR PRODUCTS

⚠️DRY SCALP

⚠️HAIR FOLLICLE SENSITIVITY

⚠️ALLERGY

What Causes Seasonal Hair Loss?

According to a study by Swedish researchers, hair usually enters the resting phase in the middle of summer.

The reason for this is that our hair protects our scalp from the strong summer sun and high heat. As this heat and sun adhere to the hair, the entrance of follicles into the resting phase accelerates.

In other words, after the new phase begins in mid-summer, telogen hair loss begins in September.

So, we can list reasons with extras as follows:

❗CHANGE IN HAIR GROWTH CYCLE

❗STRESS

❗TEMPERATURE CHANGES

❗VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY

❗HORMONAL FLUCTUATIONS

Seasonal changes can cause hormonal fluctuations, and as a result, this can lead to seasonal hair loss.

Changes in temperature and humidity levels significantly affect the hair. The scalp is stressed by the temperature, and this causes the hair to fall out. After all of those changes, hair cycle disruption occurs.

Can Seasonal Allergies Cause Hair Loss?

Yes, seasonal allergies can cause hair loss.

Allergic reactions that occur as a result of the body’s interaction with any substance that it reacts with can also lead to hair loss.

Seasonal allergies can cause inflammation in the body, too. Inflammation can affect your scalp and hair follicles. This inflammation also causes hair loss.

How Long Does Seasonal Hair Loss Last?

Seasonal Hair Loss is a temporary process that does not last. It takes about 2–3 months.

The stages of the hair cycle coincide with different periods of the year. The shedding stage also usually occurs in the fall. Since the shedding phase begins in the fall, the strand falls out during the fall period.

The cycle then rewinds and transitions to the anagen phase.

Does Seasonal Hair Loss Grow Back?

Yes, it grows back. Many people may be afraid that their hair will fall out and not grow again during the shedding phase of the hair. However, there is no such thing as ‘’not growing.’’

Hair follicles return to the growth phase after the shedding period. In this phase, the hair that went away during the shedding phase starts to grow again.

⚠️ We should not forget that the hair cycle is a natural process, and hair loss is also a part of this process.

How Quickly Does Hair Grow Back from Seasonal Hair Loss?

The growing-back process may vary from person to person, but generally, this process only takes a few months.

In a few months, your lost hair will grow back. To specify the time of this period, we can say that it may take up to 6 months.

Hair growth can be accelerated with a healthy diet, scalp health care, and hair growth supplements. 

How to Stop Seasonal Hair Loss

It is impossible to stop seasonal hair loss completely. It is a natural cycle that the body experiences as long as it is not excessive.

Seasonal shedding will stop naturally.

How to Reduce Seasonal Hair Loss In Women

It is possible to reduce seasonal hair loss and maintain the health of the hair. By applying these steps in this process, we can minimize hair loss while maintaining the health of the hair that will grow. 

Doing the following can reduce seasonal hair loss.

  • HAIR CARE REGIMEN
  • SCALP HEALTH CARE
  • SCALP HYDRATION
  • BALANCED DIET 
  • ANTIOXIDANT-RICH DIET
  • REDUCING STRESS
  • SUPPLEMENTS
  • AVOIDING HEATERS (HAIR STRAIGHTENERS, CURLERS) 

How to Prevent Seasonal Hair Loss

We cannot prevent seasonal hair loss, but we can shorten its lifespan. First of all, it is important to note that the cause of hair loss should be clearly determined. You need to see an expert. Proceeding with an expert and acting on their recommendations will lead you to the most accurate result. 

We need to change some habits to prevent seasonal shedding. 

⚠️HEALTHY EATING IS A MUST.

⚠️THE USE OF SUPPLEMENTS IMPROVES THE POWER OF YOUR HAIR.

⚠️DON’T STRESS, AND SEE HOW YOUR HAIR WILL BE HEALTHY.

⚠️HAIR CARE REGIMEN AND SCALP CARE (USING THE RIGHT PRODUCTS, SHAMPOO, AND SERUMS) WILL MAKE YOUR HAIR POWERFUL.

⚠️ SEASONAL HAIR CARE WILL MEET YOUR SPECIFIC NEEDS FOR YOUR HAIR.

Does Geography Affect Your Seasonal Hair Loss?

It cannot be said that geography directly causes seasonal hair loss, yet geography is often regarded as one of the contributing effects of seasonal hair loss. 

If the seasonal climates in one country are different from another, people living in these two countries will experience seasonal hair loss in different seasons. 

If this seasonal hair loss is due to climate change, yes, we can say that geography affects it. Climate and geography are interconnected in this regard.

Don’t forget to check the hair loss traction chart we prepared for you! 

[1] Asghar, Fahham. “Telogen Effluvium: A Review of the Literature.” NCBI, 27 May 2020.

[2] Randall, V A, and F J Ebling. “Seasonal changes in human hair growth.” The British journal of dermatology vol. 124,2 (1991): 146-51. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2133.1991.tb00423.x

[3] Ebling, F J. “The biology of hair.” Dermatologic clinics vol. 5,3 (1987): 467-81.