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Smoking After Hair Transplant: Can You Smoke After The Surgery?

One of the frequently asked questions about the postop is can I smoke after hair transplant. Smoking after a hair transplant is prohibited due to nicotine’s effect on the healing tissue. Some hair transplant patients might face a difficult time trying to stop smoking for the procedure. However, there are various methods that can help someone stop smoking, whether it is only for hair transplant surgery or for life.

It is important to keep transplanted hair follicles healthy and well-fed during the recovery phase. This will ensure the long-term success of the hair transplant. Being exposed to nicotine after a hair transplant can compromise the result of the procedure.

The takeaways of this article are:

  • YOU SHOULDN’T SMOKE AT LEAST FOR 2 WEEKS AFTER HAIR TRANSPLANT
  • SMOKING INCREASES CHANCE OF RISKS AND COMPLICATIONS
  • ANY FORM OF NICOTINE OR TOBACCO SHOULD BE AVOIDED
  • SMOKING CAN AFFECT THE RESULT AND THE SUCCESS OF THE HAIR TRANSPLANT

When Can I Smoke After Hair Transplant?

Ideally, you should wait 3-4 months after hair transplant to smoke or stop altogether. However, you can smoke 2 weeks after hair transplant surgery provided you do not smoke heavily. This includes vaping, chewing nicotine gums, or consuming nicotine in any way.

What Are The Risks Of Smoking Right After A Hair Transplant Surgery?

Smoking affects the oxygen supply and blood circulation in a negative way. Not smoking after FUE hair transplant, or FUT or DHI, is crucial for hair follicles to heal for the utmost success. If you start smoking right after a hair transplant, you are decreasing the chance of success of your hair grafting procedure.

Risks of smoking cigarettes right after hair transplant surgery include but are not limited to:

  • EXTENDED RECOVERY
  • INCREASED RISK OF INFECTION AND COMPLICATIONS
  • PREVENTED NEW HAIR DEVELOPMENT
  • DELAYED HEALING
  • BLOOD CLOT FORMATION
  • INCREASED PAIN
  • SCARRING
  • DRIED SKIN
  • HAIR LOSS
  • EXCESSIVE BLEEDING
  • EXCESSIVE OOZING
  • DECREASED NUTRIENT DELIVERY TO THE FOLLICLES


Along with these risks, smoking can also make you cough and sometimes sneeze. After a hair transplant, it is important to avoid things that can make you cough or sneeze for the first few days. Because if you cough or sneeze intensely, you might face follicle displacement and swelling. And these can affect the newly-planted hair grafts.

Can I Vape Instead Of Smoking?

No, you shouldn’t be vaping after a hair transplant as vapes and electronic cigarettes still contain nicotine. These can also affect the newly-implanted hair grafts negatively.

Can I Smoke Weed After Hair Transplant?

No, smoking weed after hair transplant is no different than smoking tobacco. Certain chemicals in weeds like marijuana affect cell growth and oxygen supply around the body. This can affect the new hair’s health and recovery, resulting in a less desirable result.

Can I Use Nicotine Gums Or Patches?

No, you shouldn’t use nicotine gums or patches. Nicotine itself affects hair health in this matter. So, you should decrease your nicotine consumption as much as possible.

How Does Smoking Affect The Healing Process After A Hair Transplant?

Smoking after hair transplant can slow the recovery process, or worse, can cause an adverse result in the hair transplant.

Nicotine and other active ingredients inside a cigarette, any other tobacco product, and the carbon monoxide released from them affect the oxygen supply to the injured area by constricting and stiffening vessels. If this further affects the tissue, the conditions below might be observed:

  • SLOW HEALING
  • SCALP NECROSIS
  • EXCESSIVE SCABBING AND CRUSTING
  • INFECTION

Can Secondhand Smoke Affect My Hair Transplant Results?

There are not enough clinical studies on secondhand smoking affecting hair transplant results. However, secondhand smoke is still something you should avoid after a hair transplant, whether you are a smoker or not to minimize your exposure to tobacco smoke.

Does Smoking Impact The Success Of A Hair Transplant?

Yes, smoking can greatly impact the success of hair transplants. Nicotine constricts the blood arteries, causing the oxygen supply to be slowed. Initially, smoking is a known factor for hair loss. After a hair transplant, it can affect the new hair and cause it to fall out. So, it is important to avoid smoking after a hair transplant if the desired result is the utmost success.

Are There Any Specific Recommendations For Smoking Cessation Post-Hair Transplant?

If you are willing to stop smoking altogether after your hair transplant, there are specific methods you can try to manage cravings and avoid starting smoking again. For instance:

  • TRY NICOTINE PATCHES OR OTHER NICOTINE REPLACEMENTS AT LEAST 2 WEEKS AFTER THE SURGERY
  • AVOID TEMPTATIONS, TRIGGERS, AND “JUST ONE CIGARETTE”S
  • KEEP YOUR MIND BUSY VIA HOBBIES AND EXERCISES
  • TRY VARIOUS RELAXING METHODS TO MANAGE STRESS, SUCH AS MEDITATION
  • IF YOU FIND YOURSELF WANTING TO GO FOR A SMOKE, ALWAYS TELL YOURSELF “30 MINUTES LATER”

How To Manage Nicotine Cravings After Hair Transplant?

There are certain precautions you can take and things that you can do to manage nicotine cravings after a hair transplant. These could be:

  • ASK YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY FOR SUPPORT
  • TRY TO STOP SMOKING BEFORE THE PROCEDURE
  • AVOID TEMPTATIONS
  • CHEW REGULAR GUM
  • CREATE DISTRACTIONS AND FOCUS ON RECOVERY

Let’s elaborate.

Ask Your Friends And Family For Support

It is okay to ask for help! You can ask your family and friends to look out for you. And if anyone from your inner circle is also a smoker, you can ask them to minimize their smoking around you. This way, you can have an easier time fighting your temptations, and this will also help you boost your faith in yourself!

Try To Stop Smoking Before The Procedure

If you stop smoking a few weeks before your hair transplant, you will have an easier time managing your nicotine cravings after the procedure because you will have already gone through the withdrawals. Meaning the hardest part will be behind you.

Avoid Temptations

What do we mean by temptations? Anything that can remind you of smoking. For instance, if you smoke each time you consume coffee or alcohol, try and avoid them. This will help you not get reminded of tobacco.

Besides that, not visiting the places where you go to smoke can also help you fight your temptations. For instance, try to avoid going to smoking areas in cafes, at your job, at airports, etc.

Chew Regular Gum

One of the main reasons why people have a hard time quitting smoking is that it is a habit. Keeping your mouth and lips occupied can help you keep your mind off of tobacco. Chewing regular gum, or any gum that does not contain nicotine, can help you keep yourself occupied. Just try to not annoy the people around you when you do!

Create Distractions And Focus On Recovery

You can create distractions of your liking to manage your nicotine cravings. You can use tools like fidget toys, stress balls, spinning pens, making new hobbies, etc.

After the hair transplant procedure, recovery is crucial for a successful result. You need to take good care of your scalp and hair health. Keep your focus on that. And keep reminding yourself that smoking can affect the result of your hair transplant.

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